Currently reading?
I did a slightly fuller review of "The Scar" on page 7 here.

Btw, if any Mod/Admin feels I'm breaking any rules/etiquette by linking to another Forum, feel free to nuke this Smile
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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I read your piece, and I fully concur.
:paw: Speak up! Don't mumble!!
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Hmmm...interesting. PSS is very cool, so far, though. I shall reserve my opinions until I read The Scar myself!
'No matter how the world makes out in the next few centuries, a large class of readers will not be too surprised at anything. They will have been through it all before in fictional form.' - De Camp
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Quote:Originally posted by Mouse
IMHO, "Perdido Street Station" is a future classic, it's a shame that the follow-up, "The Scar" is such a disappointment.



Ouch, ouch, ouch!!! I couldn't stand reading PSS. It took me forever to get through about 100 pages and then I quit. I just couldn't stand it. It was so dark and depressing.


I just finished reading Robin Hobb's latest, Fool's Fate. It was amazing!!!! I am sad that it's the last in the series, but it tied the other two triologies together superbly. She always amazes me with her writing. I can never predict what's going to happen, but I always like the way she ends things.

I'm probably going to start the Da Vincci Code tomorrow.
Bootstrap's Bootstraps.
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"Clothar the Frank" the latest in his series The Camalod cronicles. Great read.
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Hello everyone, I'm new to the board and from what I've read so far it seems to be a great place to be!

Right now I'm reading Terry Brooks, First King of Shannara, The Lord of the Rings (again), my own work (as I work with my editor), and eagerly awaiting the release of George RR Martin's A Feast of Crows. I'm also reading some historical stuff that doesn't really fit into the fantasy category.

Randolph
http://www.fatecycle.com
Randolph Lalonde
Author / Project Director - Fate Cycle Series
Wanderer - Of many dreams
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I wish Martin would hurry up and finish that book. Last time I checked hi site there was still no word when it would be publihed.

Which historicals are you reading?
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Right now I'm reading the Historians of Greece and Rome by Stephen Usher (University of Oklahoma Press & Bristol Classical Press), and A History of Private Life From Pagan Rome to Byzantium (Paul Veyne, Editor, Arthur Goldhammer, Translator - The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1987).

I'm enjoying A History of Private Life more, kind of picking at The Historians of Greece and Rome to be honest. Other than that I've been reading the online collections of Chaucer's tales out loud when I'm in the mood. The only way to read them (as I'm concerned) is aloud in a nice oratory tone. My neighbors think I'm pretty much insane at this point...
http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~chau...tales.html


Anyway, back to work...

Randolph
http://www.fatecycle.com
Randolph Lalonde
Author / Project Director - Fate Cycle Series
Wanderer - Of many dreams
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Chaucer is always immense fun, except in the confines of a literature classroom.

I finished Perdido Street Station - loved it, can't wait to catch up on The Scar! Am now back on classic sf with a book called The Book of Fred Saberhagen, a collection of his SF short stories frm the 70s. Quite nice so far.
'No matter how the world makes out in the next few centuries, a large class of readers will not be too surprised at anything. They will have been through it all before in fictional form.' - De Camp
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As previously mentioned "The Cassandra Complex" by Brian Stableford has now been and gone with scarcely a ripple of interext in it's passing Smile I'm now reading"Geomancer" by Ian Irvine. Much more enjoyable.

I normally steer well clear of fantasy doorstops, especially when they are the first volume in a series as I've had far too many encounters with sub-Tolkein cliches. Heaven help me, I even struggled through "The Legacy of the Drow" at one point and survived. This one however is much better - nicely paced, intruigingly plotted (sort of fantasy spiced up with a touch of steampunk) and contains believable and well drawn characters.

So far recommended :bg:
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
Reply
Quote:Originally posted by Mouse
As previously mentioned "The Cassandra Complex" by Brian Stableford has now been and gone with scarcely a ripple of interext in it's passing Smile


I've seen it around and was vaguely considerig picking it up. Where did it fall short?
'No matter how the world makes out in the next few centuries, a large class of readers will not be too surprised at anything. They will have been through it all before in fictional form.' - De Camp
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Quote:Originally posted by knivesout
I've seen it around and was vaguely considerig picking it up. Where did it fall short?

It's a near future detective/thriller type book that seems to me to have a complete lack of pacing, tension and an over reliance on technobabble. If you want something in that general area, something like "Altered Carbon" by Richard K. Morgan would be a better bet.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
Reply
Thanks for the response and the recommendation, Mouse! I have heard a lot about Altered Carbon and I guess I shall add it to my to-get list!
'No matter how the world makes out in the next few centuries, a large class of readers will not be too surprised at anything. They will have been through it all before in fictional form.' - De Camp
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On the Richard Morgan theme, I've just finished Broken Angels. Same main character,Takeshi Kovacs but different location. Same non-stop action,same violence, same sneaky witty humerous remarks.
Same good read in fact.
Only one small complaint, RM is a British author and the book I read was from a British publisher. So why did we have to have it lapse into American English on occasions? I read plenty of books written by US authors and I can understand them without any problem.Our own version of English(the original don't forget Smile ) must be worth preserving.

I see his first book Altered Carbon has been bought up by Hollywood, not that necessarily means much. Even if they did make it, would we recognise any of it?
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Quote:Originally posted by Eiley
I just finished reading Robin Hobb's latest, Fool's Fate. It was amazing!!!! I am sad that it's the last in the series, but it tied the other two triologies together superbly. She always amazes me with her writing. I can never predict what's going to happen, but I always like the way she ends things.


Indeed? Many of her long-term fans, myself included, have been rather stupified (to put nicely) by the way that last book turned out, did you know that? I am not sure if I enjoyed it only for the sake of the characters I`m so attached to or for the book itself. But it was very emotional, too. And more sarcastic. And so somewhat different to her ealier books. Certainly, it was occationally very good indeed, some of her the most wonderful scenes, I`d say, but at times it really was 'surprising' to say the least. It horrified me for many reasons.
I won`t spoil anything here.
But I`m open to discussion if you like.
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Well, I have read her books in the wrong order. I read 'The Liveship Traders' first several months ago and have only just picked up again with 'The Farseer Trilogy'. I am nearly finished 'Assassin's Apprentice' and about to start 'Royal Assassin'. I love her style of writing and think she develops characters (and usually lots of them) amazingly. Fitz is a great character, but from what I can recall from the Liveships and the characters in those books, I am assuming he is not in for either an easy or a pleasant time ahead. It's not too often that you get to read a book/series where you really have no idea where the author is going with their story, but Robin Hobb seems to be a master in her art....:crown:
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I just finished a volume of short stories by Fred Saberhagen. Mostly traditional space opera style fare, but quite good, and a few stories that broke the mould to present some very interesting notions.

I am now starting on Fred Pohl's Man Plus, which seems very topical with Europe and the US announcing plans to land humans on Mars in the next 20 years or so!
'No matter how the world makes out in the next few centuries, a large class of readers will not be too surprised at anything. They will have been through it all before in fictional form.' - De Camp
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Oh,will o the wisp... Certainly Hobb does write very vivid multi-layered stories and gives a rare credit to the mundane parts of live. No ultimate-evil and only questionable good. And she fears not to let her characters fail. Realistic, pessimistic, but wise.
Mostly. Wink
But yes, I adore her writing too.

So, you`ve read the whole Liveships and then went on to read the Farseer? Well, people have done worse. :tongue:

(possible Liveship spoiler)
To view, use your mouse to select the text:
Have you already catched RH`s Liveships trick? Concerning a certain character?
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Quote:Originally posted by Badgerlock

So, you`ve read the whole Liveships and then went on to read the Farseer? Well, people have done worse. :tongue:

(possible Liveship spoiler)
To view, use your mouse to select the text:
Have you already catched RH`s Liveships trick? Concerning a certain character?




Rolleyes I know, I know!!! But hey!!! What a great series to start on though.....

(SPOILER ALERT)
To view, use your mouse to select the text:
I assume you mean Amber. Although I'm still not entirely sure what is happening here, but I remember as I was reading Liveships that all the way through it I kept getting the feeling that Amber was more involved than was let on. The only way this was possible was for her to be somehow tangled in 'Farseer'. My guess is that the Fool is somehow connected to this mystery!!!

But as I said before, it is very hard to predict any events in RH's stories - she has a real knack of writing her main characters into times that are hard and tough to live through and then just when you think they can't take any more - she dishes out more to them.... Great Stuff!!!!!!
Ok, gotta go....it seems I still have a lot of reading to be getting on with.

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Right now I'm reading "On Liberty" by John Stuart Mill. Hopefully this book doesn't qualify as fantasy or sci-fi.
Curb your dogma
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