The Da Vinci Code - mild spoilers
#1
Have you read the book?

No!?!

In truth, you aren't missing that much. Like almost any phenomonally successful novel, The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown (who, I understand, is changing his name to The Very, Very, Very Rich Dan Brown so as to avoid confusion with others of the same name) is a fairly basic premise of boy-meets-girl-while-being-chased-by-a-secret-society-while-trying-to-discover-the-secrets-of-another-secret-society. Michael Crichton has been offering us the same airplane-type fiction for generations.

But with the runaway (and we're talking on the top 10 best seller list for the past two-and-a-half years), of course the thing was destined to become a movie star. Released last week, it has already grossed over $77 million domestically ($224 million worldwide), marking it as the first truly big blockbuster of 2006, not to mention 2005 and the release of Pirates of the Caribbean.

Take that Tom "MI:3-has-only-done-$59-million" Cruise!

Professor of Religious Symbology Robert Langdon (Tom Hanks) is giving a rather successful lecture on the concepts of the "sacred feminine" in, of all rebellious places, Paris when he is suddenly called in and implicated in the murder of the head curator of the Louvre (which is also conveniently located in Paris). A chase insues involving both the French police as headed by Captain Fache (Jean Reno), the "secret" Catholic organization Opus Dei via a very scary Paul Bettany, the secret though rather pretty Sophie (Audrey Tautou) and the ultra-secret Priory of Scion. All of which are pointed at a secret so baffling, so fundamentally earth-shaking that even knowing it can be deadly:

Keanu Reeves cannot act.

Sorry, that wasn't the secret. That's pretty well known. :wicked:

But as we know, it's not the destination that is so interesting, it's the journey. On the mad dash through history, France and England, the reader of the book and the view of the movie are treated to some fascinating speculation regarding both the secret and its keepers. That the speculation is carried by only tenuous links, and that equally reasonable and more widely accepted theories don't make an appearance is also part of the fun. It's the "what if" of fiction wrapped in a little bit of history and sprinkled with a mystery that we know will be solved, if not completely, by the end of the show.

The Da Vinci Code, with author Dan Brown as executive producer, is fairly true to the book. The actors turn in impressive performances, including the aforementioned Hanks, Tautou, Reno and especially Sir Ian McKellen. The scope is amazing, and even if the story is on the "iffy" side, it gives an audience something rarely seen from an action movie: a discussion topic for Sunday school!

The movie, like the book, operates on a fairly believable premise regarding Jesus Christ and his oft-disputed history. The Bible aside, we have very few Rolling Stone articles on The Man (or the Son of Man, if you prefer) himself.
All your base are belong to us.

It could be that the purpose of my life is only to serve as a warning to others.
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#2
I, too, enjoyed this movie...even tho' the critics had not been as kind as they might have been (I should know by now that my opinion rarely concurs with the critics). The only thing I might add to RobRoy's excellent post was that the cinematography was beautiful, and the score by Hans Zimmer was one of his best. Wink
" It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes." - Douglas Adams
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#3
I read the book, and while I found the story interesting, I found Brown's writing to be painful.

The suspense was drawn out and fake, the prose just plain bad.

"...his horror now laced with fear...." is an actual line. As opposed to what, the fear free horror of a few minutes ago?

I edit a speculative fiction ezine, and I'd have rejected Da Vinci code outright.

I bought the book purely to annoy the Catholic church, and will see the movie. It might be ok. The story is fine, and since I won't have to have Brown's writing dragged across my eyeballs like broken glass, it might be fine.
Wrestling Darwin on a daily basis.

"Question boldly even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason than that of a blindfolded fear." -Thomas Jefferson
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#4
Mike of Quantum Muse Wrote:I read the book, and while I found the story interesting, I found Brown's writing to be painful.

The suspense was drawn out and fake, the prose just plain bad.

"...his horror now laced with fear...." is an actual line. As opposed to what, the fear free horror of a few minutes ago?

I edit a speculative fiction ezine, and I'd have rejected Da Vinci code outright.

I bought the book purely to annoy the Catholic church, and will see the movie. It might be ok. The story is fine, and since I won't have to have Brown's writing dragged across my eyeballs like broken glass, it might be fine.

My husband and daughter have read the book and they too felt that it was poorly written.

At the moment I am reading a book written by Raymond Khoury. It is called The Last Templar. My husband read it and found it a better read than The Da Vinci Code. I am enjoying the book and can see a possible film.

I will not bother reading The Da Vinci Code. I will probably see the film.

With love.
Lorne.
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#5
the only thing i really enjoyed about the movie was Silas, everything else i dunno... It just didnt fit if you join all the words that tom hanks actually said in the whole move you'd probably have like 7 minutes he's good, you know, I like tom hanks but it seems that the studio only used him for his name or something.
the book i found it amusing and thats all
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#6
Well personally, I really enjoyed the book. I found it not only to be thought provoking but also an enjoyable page turner. While the writing might not stand up to much analysis or comparison to the literary greats, it is certainly accessible!

I was looking forward to the film. It's a shame it has got such a slating. I'll probably hang on and see it on DVD.
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#7
I took great care in not reading the above statements (in fear of spoilers...which is sort of dumb because i have already read the book, and i'm sure it follows the book) because i havn't seen it yet. I plan to see it this saturday, and i have high hopes for it, espescially because tom hanks is starring in it. and because i liked the book.
Don't do nothing.
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#8
Jammin ignore the critics and see the movie if you enjoyed the book.
Tongue
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#9
Jammin Wrote:I was looking forward to the film. It's a shame it has got such a slating. I'll probably hang on and see it on DVD.

I'm not certain what the critics were looking for, or expecting for that matter. The movies does what the book did.

However, I don't think you would lose anything in the experience watching the movie on DVD.
All your base are belong to us.

It could be that the purpose of my life is only to serve as a warning to others.
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#10
Is it gruesome at all?
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#11
HOBBIT Wrote:Jammin ignore the critics and see the movie if you enjoyed the book.

Oh, I'll definitely see it, it's just whether I make the effort to see it at the cinema or not! I really try hard not to be swayed by film reviews, but I guess I'm just weak minded! :dummy:

Actually a friend of mine saw it last night and really enjoyed it. She has read the book but went with a couple of other people who had not and they liked it as well. She did say that Tom Hanks was rubbish mind you!
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#12
Arcadia Wrote:Is it gruesome at all?

There are two scenes that might be considered gruesome. They both involve Silas, the albino monk from Opus Dei.

Even the murder scene that starts all the events in motion is barely shown at all.

Jammin Wrote:She did say that Tom Hanks was rubbish mind you!

Well, perhaps she isn't to be trusted then! :bg:
All your base are belong to us.

It could be that the purpose of my life is only to serve as a warning to others.
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#13
I saw the film and thought it was enjoyable. Nothing spectacular, but a good film and it did stick largely to the book.
However, Im not sure why they decided to leave out the part in which Sophie discovers that her brother did survive and was living with her grandmother though.

Matt
And she said 'Hoots I cannae get back tae me hoos in Bonny Scotland'
Girl with the Hazel Eyes - Ahhhhhh!
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#14
it was more dramatic for her to be the sole remaining decesendant of Jesus.
Tongue
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#15
Alternately, it wasn't necessary to the plot, and that extra explanation would have made the movie that much longer. It's already at 149 minutes.
All your base are belong to us.

It could be that the purpose of my life is only to serve as a warning to others.
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#16
Best lines from the guy who followed me as movie critic for our local alternative weekly:


Quote:As far as the movie itself, it's a very taut, exciting thriller, masterfully shot and edited and with a fine musical score by Hans Zimmer (Batman Begins). My only real complaints are, in a movie populated by fine co-stars - like Reno (The Pink Panther), Bettany (Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World), Al Molina (Spider-Man 2) and Ian McKellan (Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King) - if you see
To view, use your mouse to select the text:
three of them phoning, at various times, the nefarious mastermind behind the evil plot, you know that said mastermind must by default be the last big-name co-star, and it puts the brakes on everything as you wait for Hanks to figure out what we've known for three reels.
:laugh:

Second, if the curator of the Louvre, after being fatally shot, has enough time to plant all kinds of clues and riddles, including stripping himself naked and carving arcane religious symbols into his flesh, could he not just as easily have called Hanks on his cell phone and said, "I've just been shot, and here's who did it and why"? But if he had done that, then I guess a two-and-a-half-hour film would collapse into a nine-minute film.

:bounce:
August  - Jack's Pack Fan # 1, Keeper of the List, 3-Time Speaker of the JoAT Fan Quote of the Week, and the only person ever to have Back 2 Back Jack and Cleo fan quotes !
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#17
RobRoy Wrote:Well, perhaps she isn't to be trusted then! :bg:

LOL, You obviously know her! :wicked:
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#18
I've never read the book but the movie definitely convinced me never to read it! It just wasn't exciting enough.
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#19
AJ786 Wrote:I've never read the book but the movie definitely convinced me never to read it! It just wasn't exciting enough.

Books are almost always better than the movie. The Da Vinci Code is no exception. However, if you didn't enjoy the movie, then you won't enjoy the book, as the book is just more of the same.
All your base are belong to us.

It could be that the purpose of my life is only to serve as a warning to others.
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#20
I liked the idea but didn't like how they showed it on screen. perhaps i will read it than..thanks for the advice.
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