Is witchcraft inherently evil?
#1
Is witchcraft inherently evil?
Reply
#2
sure is.................
"It's like, how much more black could this be? And the answer is none. None more black."
Reply
#3
Of course not.
While I don't mean to speak for any practioners of the craft, I do know that it's basically an earth-based pagan religion, whose main precept is "harm no one."

I suppose some people will use magick for evil purposes, but the religion itself is neutral.

Rh
Reply
#4
I think black magic is evil,but witchcraft it self..I don't think so.
Reply
#5
The answer depends on
A). The ethical/religious paradigm you are working from (what makes anything "evil")
B). What in reality "witchcraft" is.

For example:

A). From within a monotheistic religion like Islam, Christianity, or Judaism
B). If "witchcraft" is defined as ritual/magical practices which appeal to supernatural forces (real or imagined) belief in which detracts from belief in God (I believe this is the definition generally used in biblical passages referring to witchcraft or sorcery).
C). Witchcraft is then inherently evil. (Given that I agree with A., I agree with C. given the definition in B.)

Naturally what one does with "inherently evil" things is also a matter for some disagreement. Jewish, Christian, and Islamic believers have held beliefs ranging from "all witches should be burned" to "all practicioners of witchcraft should be treated with love and respect and hope that they will recognize the error of their ways." Jewish, Christian, and Islamic theologians have also differed on whether the forces appealed to in witchraft are real or not. There does, however, seem to be a wide agreement (at least historically) that witchcraft (as defined above) is evil.

Naturally Wiccans and other neopagan religions disagree with both A) and B), using the term "witchcraft" to refer to rituals rooted in their own religions tradition, thus if you are a Wiccan, witchraft is inherently good.

Athiests tend to define witchcraft as superstitions without substance, in which case they might be evil or not depending on what non-religious ethical system is employed.
"Bigotry is an incapacity to conceive seriously the alternative to a proposition."
-- G. K. Chesterton
Reply
#6
EagleoftheStar Wrote:The answer depends on
A). The ethical/religious paradigm you are working from (what makes anything "evil")
B). What in reality "witchcraft" is.

For example:

A). From within a monotheistic religion like Islam, Christianity, or Judaism
B). If "witchcraft" is defined as ritual/magical practices which appeal to supernatural forces (real or imagined) belief in which detracts from belief in God (I believe this is the definition generally used in biblical passages referring to witchcraft or sorcery).
C). Witchcraft is then inherently evil. (Given that I agree with A., I agree with C. given the definition in B.)

agreed.

This in turn calls us to define Monotheism. The followers of Christianity, Islam and Judaism (or many of them) use the term Monotheism to refer strictly to this family of religions.

Others may define Monotheism by the meaning of its Greek entymology: ie, having or concerning one or a single God.

If one reads Tolkien's Silmarillion, one encounters a religion knowing one single God (Eru) but many Vala (gods) who have considerable power to follow their own wills. This religion is thuis both monotheistic and polytheistic. I wonder to what extent the Pagan religions of old also recognised such a duality. Modern Hindusim certainly does.

In Christianity too, there are other good powers besides God (angels, saints etc - although different sectarian divisons may have differing opinions on their relevance and whether or not they should be venerated). Judaism and Islam also recognise the concept of angels. In these strictly monotheistic religions, however, the power of these 'other' forces is far more insignificant and subsiduary to God's own power than it is in the Pagan situation described above.

I don't know enough about Wicca or other modern forms of Paganism to know whether these do still recognise an almighty divine being or whether the world for them is governed only by these lesser supernatural powers. I wonder if it is this recognition that can make all the difference between 'good' and 'evil' magical practices.
Reply
#7
I don't think witchcraft is evil in itself, but some people who choose to perform it decide weather they are good or bad witches, and if they are bad then they can turn witchcraft into something darker, and then it becomes black magic.
Reply
#8
Wolf of Isengard Wrote:I don't think witchcraft is evil in itself, but some people who choose to perform it decide weather they are good or bad witches, and if they are bad then they can turn witchcraft into something darker, and then it becomes black magic.

Do you think people want to be good or bad witches or is it something they just become as a result of involvement in witchcraft?
Reply
#9
I think this entirely depends on the intent of the practitioner and ones idea of evil.
I would define evil as something immoral, and of course morality is a combination of personal beliefs and public consensus.
My idea of witchcraft is the practice of "casting spells" for a purpose. I think that the purpose would determine whether this was "white"witchcraft or "evil"witchcraft.
My friend has a huge book about white witchcraft and it is filled with all sorts of spells designed for the power of good. They mostly seem to be various types of meditation with added candle circles, incense burning, chanting etc. And they are all intended for the "witch" to acheive better enlightenment, peace in their lives or to see spirit. Personally I dont see that there can be any more power in these spells other than that which one can get anyway from meditiation.
I have seen programmes on the telly about Voodoo and they showed that there are people who practice this for good and those who do "evil" with it. Again, it looked like meditation, chanting and often incorporated the use of halucenagenic (sp?) drugs (which I think have the effect of opening up the 3rd eye).
I'm not convinced that the practice of casting spells can actually have a real effect as such because I think it's all in the mind. So if someone practising it believes in its effects and the person on the recieving end believes in it too, the result can be psychosematic, i.e the power of positive thought (or even negative thought) can have a real physical effect on the believer. Real practises like rituals and so on can obviously have a real effect as they have a real cause.

So, no, I dont think witchcraft is inherently evil, but the intent of the person practising it can always be, just as any intent or action can be.
Happy:daisy:
Reply
#10
shadowfax Wrote:I don't know enough about Wicca or other modern forms of Paganism to know whether these do still recognise an almighty divine being or whether the world for them is governed only by these lesser supernatural powers. I wonder if it is this recognition that can make all the difference between 'good' and 'evil' magical practices.

It's my understanding that Wiccans, while they may invoke and/or evoke various 'powers' for whatever purposes they need, do worship a single deity.
It just happens to be a feminine principle, as opposed to the masculine, patriachal god of the big three religions.

Rh
Reply
#11
In response to shadowfax, I think that when a person decides to become a witch they also can decide at that moment weather they want to be a good or bad one. It can be said that some people may turn from good to bad witches, but I don't think people turn to be bad witches just from envolvement in witchcraft.
Reply

MYCode Guide

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Plastic is Evil Coconut Ent 2 497 February 8th, 2007, 04:15 PM
Last Post: Alvin Eriol
  Face Cards are Evil? RobRoy 12 1,376 December 17th, 2004, 04:42 PM
Last Post: Mike of Quantum Muse
  Evil Camech 21 1,136 February 25th, 2004, 11:53 AM
Last Post: RobRoy
  evil or error? shadowfax 113 4,869 September 23rd, 2003, 08:30 AM
Last Post: venmax

Forum Jump: