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The commenters are correct who pointed out she was Macedonian Greek (and probably red-headed as that people tended to be) descended from Alexander's general Ptolemy, and therefore shouldn't be expected to look Egyptian, much less Arab nemmine Israeli! The original Egyptians weren't Arabs (also a Semitic people) either; they weren't prevalent there until the 1st Islamic expansion, though Libyans and Arabs and other Semitic peoples (and Ethiopians and "Minoan" Greeks incl the so-called "Sea Peoples including the Philistines) had had relations with Egypt since maybe early Bronze if not Chalcolithic times.

Cleopatra was actually the first (and only) Pharaoh of the Ptolemy line to learn and speak Egyptian herself. I've also read that some archaeologists/historians had opined she wasn't even all that great-looking; her charms had more to do with the kingdom she brought to the table than her person, they claim.
In other news, none of the actors who have played Abe Lincoln were actual members of the Lincoln family, Shatner and Nimoy were neither Iowan nor Vulcan, and Christ-portrayers Jeffrey Hunter and Max von Shadow weren't Jewish...although Shatner and Nimoy were! Tongue

This is an excuse to get Gal into a metal bikini, so more power to 'em. Wink
Good points. Makes you wonder who will be casted as Mark Anthony and Julius Caesar?
I think the outcry is misguided but the racial/ethnic representation of ancient Egypt is so politically charged there will probably always be complaints.
Yep, the history concerns are misguided...but so is the ignorance of how acting works. Lin-Manuel Miranda's not the illegitimate son of a Scotsman either. ūüėČ

One solution to the under-representation of ethnic Egyptians....maybe an Egyptian film company could make their own movie, and leave Hollywood alone?

I still think Hines and Purefoy as Caesar and Antony in HBO's Rome were perfect. From among younger actors... maybe one of the Colins (Firth, Clive) or Rupert Everett or Hugh Laurie as Caesar, and Nikolaj Coster- Waldau (sp.?) as Antony?
(October 13th, 2020, 01:45 AM)badlands Wrote: [ -> ]https://www.timesofisrael.com/gal-gadot-...-of-egypt/

Do you agree with the outcry?

Commercial movies are a business.  They have to make money, the business is similar to sharks.  You have to keep moving forward.  Stopping - or slowing down - is death.

So Gadot is a good choice - she's familiar, a known name & we know she can carry a movie.  @ the same time, she looks exotic.  The historical Cleopatra - I don't know that there's any reliable evidence on what exactly she looked like.  That being the case, Hollywood can put in a ringer, if they want, & pass her off as authentic. 

Given the parlous state of the US movie industry - because of the COVID pandemic, the shuttering of theaters, the threatened business model of only partial seating, the hit to concession stands & seating staff & so on - the whole industry is tottering on the edge of ruin.  It wouldn't take too many more tempests in a teapot to sink the entire industry, & then we can just wait for English subtitles to Bollywood musical spectacles.

The original Cleopatra - w/ E. Taylor - was a clunker, wasn't it?  Did it ever make back its expenses?
(October 17th, 2020, 06:56 PM)southwest88 Wrote: [ -> ]So Gadot is a good choice - she's familiar, a known name & we know she can carry a movie.  @ the same time, she looks exotic.  The historical Cleopatra - I don't know that there's any reliable evidence on what exactly she looked like.  That being the case, Hollywood can put in a ringer, if they want, & pass her off as authentic. 

There are lots of contemporary portraits, but some could intentionally make her more attractive than she was, or less.  One is here . But few will care how historically accurate someone looks.
The original Cleopatra - w/ E. Taylor - was a clunker, wasn't it?  Did it ever make back its expenses?
[/quote]

I wonder about that myself. Why make another clunker during Covid?
Well, its clunker status was due to expenses, length, script quality, the distracting PR about the stars, probably the director and producer, and possibly competition at the box office.

A different script and team could solve all that. There have already been successful versions on TV - Leonor Varela and Timothy Dalton c. 2000, the HBO series Rome c. 2005, various BBC productions of the Shakespeare play, and Alex Guinness and Genevieve Bujold in the Shaw play c. 1976.
I remember watching that movie when I was a kid. I wasn't that impressed with the story but I did love the spectacle. Hollywood invested in huge sets and lots of extras in those days.