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Full Version: 2012 Oscar Nominations - Hollywood chooses to treat Harry Potter badly
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That must be some pretty serious jealousy, and/or fear of George Lucas, given that he has no films in the running for anything, and hasn't since 2008, and hasn't been nominated for an Oscar in almost four decades. And his last three Star Wars films were self-financed, away from Hollywood. But you're right that ILM is a huge player in Hollywood, and then there's his TV and video game work.

Of course, the Potter films are produced by Warner Brothers, i.e. mainstream Hollywood. They're just shot overseas with a foreign cast, a la the original Star Wars, The African Queen, 30 Days of Night, etc.

The way the nominations work, 5% of the Academy must nominate something as best film, with the same % within each sub-category. The most recent count is 5,783 total members, 1,311 of whom are actors. So you'd think that there would at least be 67 actors who would want to nominate one of their own from the Potter cast - there are almost that many from just within the cast of the eight films, since there are so many "names" in smaller roles. For that matter, you'd think there would be 290 people connected to Warner Brothers who would think the most recent film was worthy of a best picture nod, but actually only 9 were nominated, when there was room for as many as ten.

The other perplexing thing would be the jealousy or fear of Lucas at the Golden Globes, given out by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, by definition non-citizens who report neutrally on Hollywood for publications overseas, and so have no affiliation with Hollywood. (Or the affiliation that Fox news has with the President, or that MSNBC has with, say Newt Gingrich.) Since the bulk of those are from British empire (Canada, Australia, NZ, etc.) and former British empire (Singapore, India, etc.) countries you'd think they'd want to recognize a British-themed film like the Potter series.....
It's almost slanderous for them to ignore Harry Potter. *ALMOST*

Someone has ticked off someone but we'll probably never know the true story so we're stuck with conspiracy theories.
Yep, another thing that strikes one as odd are the SAG Awards, where the Potter stunt cast got an award, but the acting cast wasn't nominated. (And again, most of the actors in the film are voting/nominating members.)

Of course, the invisible X factor is that what inspires hardcore fans to admire something isn't always the same thing that people who actually work in the field admire.
I was curious about how Alan Rickman feels about all this. I could not find an official Website for him. There are a couple of Alan Rickman accounts on Twitter but both strike me as being suspicious. There was an interview a few weeks ago where Dan Radcliffe asked fans to lobby the Academy to give him a nomination. Of course, he was up against some pretty steep competition. There are some pretty good actors in the list above and many, many more in the industry who also deserve a nomination.

Still, I wish Alan had appeared on the list.
So I did a little research, and see that 6 of the 8 films have gotten at least one nomination, but none for acting, directing or writing. They have all been for music, art direction, visual effects, etc. and have never won anything. Most of the people nominated though have won before for other projects - John Williams (a longtime Hollywood vet who has worked with Lucas extensively) designer Stuart Craig (for British films like Gandhi and The English Patient,) etc. Rickman probably isn't surprised, since I see he has never even been nominated for an Oscar for any of his projects, although he did win an Emmy, a Golden Globe and a SAG Award for a tv movie back in the 90's. But most of the name brand folks in the supporting cast over the years have been Oscar nominees: Branagh, Thompson, Julie Walters, Imelda Staunton, Richard Harris, Maggie Smith, Gary Oldman, etc. And Chris Columbus, director/producer of the first two films, was nominated as producer of The Help this year, and screenwriter Steve Kloves was nominated for Wonder Boys some years back, and of course director Cuaron was nominated both before and after his one Potter film. So that's an awfully complex conspiracy stretching back 10 years or more...
It need not be a conspiracy. It could be a cultural snub against fantasy movies, "children's movies", British movies, movies that have included few Americans in the production, etc.

American audiences have fallen in love with Harry Potter as much as anywhere else. American film-makers not so much so.
Yep, that may be more of the case, the same thing that happened to Lucas and Spielberg early in their careers, the deadly combo of fantasy movie and children's movie. British movies however have done remarkably well over the years, with things like The King's Speech, Slumdog Millionaire, Gladiator (mainly British/British empire cast + crew) The English Patient, Shakespeare in Love, Braveheart, and the people connected to them doing very well.
FilmGuy Wrote:It need not be a conspiracy. It could be a cultural snub against fantasy movies, "children's movies", British movies, movies that have included few Americans in the production, etc.

American audiences have fallen in love with Harry Potter as much as anywhere else. American film-makers not so much so.

That could well be, in general. I think a movie has to have appeal outside of the fantasy fans. The big example, of course, being the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Although I loved the HP series as much as anyone, I do not
think it appealed much to non HP fans.

Imho, the movie that really got snubbed was Anonymous. It only got a costume nomination, and it was one of my top three favorites of 2011 ( and last year I was able to catch 24 films in the theater).:clap:
I guess there are just a LOT of Harry Potter fans, even if few of them are in the Academy. There were so many great performances in the last HP film I just can't believe they were all ignored. That's just not right.
Some of the divide may come from the difference between being a fan of something, and thinking it deserves professional awards. So George Lucas could be a fan of Flash Gordon... but still understand why the old serials weren't nominated for Oscars. Sam Raimi and Bruce Campbell can be fans of the 3 Stooges... but understand why they only got nominated once (for best short film, Men in Black.)
But how much technical evaluation really goes into the awards process? These are members of the Academy nominating movies, actors, producers, and technical people whose work they enjoyed and appreciated on a professional level -- sure -- but do they really take the time to evaluate each film according to some checklist and scoring criteria?

I have no idea of how the nominations are handled. I suppose I should look it up. Nonetheless, I get the impression it's mostly an insider popularity contest. In that respect, it's still a fandom's choice -- they're just a very select fandom. If nothing else, members of the Academy LOVE film-making, right?
Michael Wrote:But how much technical evaluation really goes into the awards process? These are members of the Academy nominating movies, actors, producers, and technical people whose work they enjoyed and appreciated on a professional level -- sure -- but do they really take the time to evaluate each film according to some checklist and scoring criteria?

I have no idea of how the nominations are handled. I suppose I should look it up. Nonetheless, I get the impression it's mostly an insider popularity contest.

Some of that is detailed above - as far as nominations go, the people within each category nominate things (i.e. writers nominate writers) and you have to have at least 5% to be in the running. Like with anything, one is supposed to maintain professional standards, but naturally, you're likely to vote for your best friend, your wife, your employer. So in many ways it's still a popularity contest...but ultimately any award or honor is. So you get back to the question of why enough individual actors, or writers, or directors, or whoever, didn't think highly enough of the Potter films to nominate them. If it's personal preferences, then the question is why didn't these films appeal to their personal preferences? And if it's professional quality, then why didn't they appeal to their professional tastes more than some other films? There's always the inevitable fan answer: the professionals don't know anything, only the fans do. But we see how far that usually gets us. Wink
I'm not a fan of Harry Potter.
We don't all have to like the same movies. I'm one of the five US fans for "John Carter". Smile


Technically, there are over 8,000 John Carter fans on this Facebook group.